Banish Your Blue Mood – How Color Contacts Affect Your Personality

Written by on October 11, 2012 in Lifestyle - No comments | Print this page

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Color contacts are a quick and easy way to change your appearance, but did you know that  changing your eye color can also change your mood? It should really come as no surprise as phrases such as “green with envy” or “seeing red” have stood the test of generations. In fact, these words carry the same meaning today as they did with our parents and grandparents.

Why Color Matters

Whether you’re buying paint to go on your bedroom walls or looking at the best colored contacts to suit your personality, there’s a reason why color has a direct effect on how we feel. This goes back to the days of cavemen when visual aides were used as a form of communication. For instance, they associated the color red with danger because they mostly saw it in conjunction with alarming things, like blood or fire. Even today the flashing red lights on a fire truck or ambulance send us the same heart racing message that danger is close at hand.

Changing out our cosmetics, clothing, even our natural eye color for the best colored contacts are simple ways to change up our style as well as our mood. Medical professionals are even using color therapy to treat mood disorders. Feeling blue on a dreary, rainy day? Throw on some spring pastels with a pair of bright green contacts to trick your body into feeling sunnier. And once your mood has improved, don’t be surprised if you learn that your infectious smile affects those around you and improves their disposition as well.

How Colors Work

Knowing what color works best to gain which effect might sound simple but finding the perfect juxtaposition between looking good and feeling good can be tricky business. Just because you have the best colored contacts for evoking feelings of being relaxed and calm doesn’t mean the rest of your look will carry through – and if you don’t know the meaning behind each color, that’s likely what will happen. Here is a quick rundown on the basic colors and the meaning behind each of them.

  • Red – Leading a presentation? Do you need to feel more confident in the board room? Red is a power color that sends out the message that you mean business. Tone it down to a pretty shade of pink for a less serious tone, or choose burgundy – like the color of red wine – for passion. What are the best colored contacts to pair with red? That’s easy – all of them!
  • Orange – Psychologists have associated the color orange with optimism for years. If your day planner reveals a plethora of social events but you’re just not feeling it, don a pair of amber color contacts and your favorite orange piece of clothing. A friend of mine keeps a pair of pumpkin-hued Chuck Tayors in her closet for this very reason.
  • Yellow – While some people traditionally associate the color yellow with fear, in the world of fashion it means cheerful, intelligent, and optimistic. Having lunch with a friend who’s as depressing as the old Saturday Night Live character, Debbie Downer? Your wearing yellow can actually help her feel more cheerful and optimistic, whether she realizes it or not. The best colored contacts to pair with yellow are shades of aqua and pale green.
  • Green – If you’re looking for an earth-friendly style, then you can’t go wrong with green. Pair it with browns to exude feelings of independence and personal growth. And of course the best colored contacts to pair with green are anything in the dark, earthy brown family. Because this color covers other natural eye colors, opaque lenses aren’t usually necessary.
  • Blue – If you’re stressed out and seeing red, then you’ll want to change into something blue, especially if it’s something cozy like cashmere or fleece. Turn on some soft music and grab a bottle of water. Too much blue will have you suffering from the case of them, but stick to blues found in nature and you’ll do fine. And if you’re going to talk to someone who you know is feeling stressed, slip in the best colored contacts for the job – blue, of course! From aqua to indigo, blue eyes are calm and reassuring to someone having a bad day.
  • Violet – Let your imagination run wild with purple, the color of creativity. In fact, you’ll find that some of the best colored contacts for creative individuals are available in a wide range of violet shades, from heather gray to royal purple. A color often associated with royalty, you don’t have to be a Drama Queen to pull off a regal look when you swath yourself in shades of violet.

Shades of Gray and Beyond

Today some of the best colored contacts to affect your mood aren’t on the standard wheel of six primary and secondary colors. If you’re looking for an inexpensive and easy way to tweak your mood, or even if you’re working to change your personality altogether, try ordering a pair of colored contacts.

A note of caution is that even if the contacts you order are Plano, meaning that they don’t alter your vision, you’ll need to schedule a visit with an eye care professional. In addition to confirming that it’s safe for you to wear contact lenses, you’ll be properly fitted and obtain a prescription which will allow you to order the best colored contacts online.

This is a guest post.  Freelance writer and graphic artist Becky James-Muth is no stranger to how color affects mood. While she enjoys experimenting with color, most of her time is spent in a world of black and white, writing blog articles, press releases, and other content for clients from around the globe.  When she’s not writing for www.colormecontacts.com she enjoys spending time with her family which includes her firefighter husband and their two home schooled sons. Becky’s hobbies include researching her family history, reading bestselling novels, and watercolor painting.

Image courtesy of Clare Bloomfield / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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